The Other Silent Majority

Hayden Couvillion

White rural America is playing an outsized role in America’s political narrative, and with reason. As J.D. Vance and Nancy Eisenberg write in their respective books, Hillbilly Elegy and White Trash, rural high-school educated white voters are facing dramatic social and economic hardships. These hardships and consequent frustrations were major forces that propelled Donald Trump from a long-shot candidate to the office of the presidency.

Yet, lost in the narrative are the stories of some 600 plus rural counties that are far from majority white.
Continue reading “The Other Silent Majority”

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Tesla is Not as Valuable as GM. Here’s Why That’s Silly

Luke Robson

Billionaire Elon Musk’s signature car company, Tesla, recently made headlines when an increase in their stock price gave them the title of most-valuable car company in the USA, ahead of giants GM and Ford. This news came as a surprise to many, and rightfully so. Tesla should be nowhere close to as valuable as GM, but optimism from investors has driven up the stock price. Continue reading “Tesla is Not as Valuable as GM. Here’s Why That’s Silly”

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The Impotence of Numbers

Recent events in the spheres of US policy on Syria, healthcare, and free trade have exposed what seems a fundamental human truth: no one really cares about the numbers.

For all our talk of data-driven policy (and the treasure troves of information available to us), it is not apparent that our decision making is based on what rigorous analysis might suggest the best solutions are. The long and short of it is that, when it comes to making policy decisions, we are far more human than we are rational. Continue reading “The Impotence of Numbers”

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If He Defunds It, They Will Come: Charitable Giving Under Trump

President Trump’s proposed cuts to the  The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for Humanities have left a bitter taste in the mouths of many. Spokespeople on the left predictably jumped to defend these supposedly indispensable programs. After all, if the government isn’t paying for these sorts of programs, who will?

As it turns out, Chance the Rapper has stepped up to the plate by crafting the New Chance Arts and Literacy Fund, benefiting arts education in Chicago Public Schools. And according to the economic theory of the crowding out effect, he probably won’t be the only one.   Continue reading “If He Defunds It, They Will Come: Charitable Giving Under Trump”

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America: Land of the “Mostly Free”

Every year the Fraser Institute and the Heritage Foundation publish their global freedom indices. These studies hope to shed some statistical light on the state of the world in terms of economic freedom. Gathering data from over 150 countries, they use rigorous data analysis to rank each country from most- to least-free.

As one would suspect, America typically performs fairly well when compared to the rest of the world. While still outperforming the majority of nations, America is showcasing a downward trend—contrary to what most Americans would hope. Continue reading “America: Land of the “Mostly Free””

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The Federal Reserve is a Necessary Evil

Recently, Janet Yellen, the Federal Reserve Chairwoman, testified to the House Financial Services Committee.  In the process, she made some minor headlines by quibbling with Republicans on the Fed’s performance.

Without a doubt, many of my fellow classical liberals greeted these headlines with disdain over the fact that the Federal Reserve exists at all. And I don’t blame them. The reasoning behind the “end the fed” movement is well founded.

But I believe ending the fed would be a misguided policy given our current situation. Continue reading “The Federal Reserve is a Necessary Evil”

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Reversing the Republican Decline in our Cities

Like the Falcons’ inexplicably terrible finish to Sunday night’s Super Bowl, the Democratic Party in 2016 blew what should have been a winnable election for them. It would not be beyond the pale to label the Democratic Party as it exists now an almost exclusively regional party—one that survives purely because of the existence of the reliably-left coasts and our nation’s major population centers.

But doing so exposes the other, less-scrutinized story of the 2016 election: Republican presence in major cities is evaporating. Continue reading “Reversing the Republican Decline in our Cities”

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Bernie and Palin Agree: Trump’s Carrier Deal is Cronyism

It’s not impossible to teach an old dog new tricks, but it’s exceedingly difficult. The same applies to our government.  One would think the election of Donald Trump, the first non-politician to win the presidency, would be a signal for a change when it comes to special interests. Nonetheless, the long-and-glorious tradition of favoring special interests, or cronyism, continued last week. President-elect Trump successfully negotiated $7 million in tax incentives for the air conditioning company, Carrier, to stay in Indiana. Continue reading “Bernie and Palin Agree: Trump’s Carrier Deal is Cronyism”

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What the Critics get Wrong on Charter Schools

This summer, charter schools came under a barrage of criticism from organizations like the NAACP, and even HBO comedian, John Oliver.

This is despite the fact that charter schools are highly popular and praised by both parties in the United States —and for good reasons. They help low-income and minority students by offering an alternative in failing school districts. As a result, there is ample evidence that charter schools provide significantly better education than their public counterparts. Continue reading “What the Critics get Wrong on Charter Schools”

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