Theresa May Teaches a Crumbling World a Lesson on Statesmanship

Michael Lucchese

On June 8, British citizens will head to the polls to vote in a snap election called by prime minister Theresa May. While some American observers may be confused by it, May’s decision-making actually offers a model of contemporary statesmanship worthy of emulation. Continue reading “Theresa May Teaches a Crumbling World a Lesson on Statesmanship”

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John’s Post-Election Journal (Part 3): After Virtue?

This is the final installment of John’s Post-Election Journal.  We hope you enjoyed! Read parts 1 and 2 if you haven’t had the chance.

By the time November 8th came around the public was still largely distraught by both candidates. The two were far from most people’s first choices and neither seemed to deserve the presidency for their own particular reasons.

As I was driving home from voting on election day, I heard this opinion once again from the DJ on a country station. He admitted that listeners may not like Trump and Clinton, but regardless, he urged everyone to still vote because voting is a part of our freedom, and our freedom is what makes us great. Continue reading “John’s Post-Election Journal (Part 3): After Virtue?”

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Russia Did it! What Exactly?

On Thursday of last week, the most senior members of the intelligence community testified to the Senate that Russia hacked the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and Hillary Clinton’s email in order to undermine the Clinton campaign and influence the election. The same officials also testified that the hacks were authorized from the highest levels of Russia’s government. Of course, none of this is new. The only problem is that President-elect Trump has denied Russia’s involvement despite knowledge to the contrary.

Yesterday, Trump finally conceded Russia might be behind the hacks. Nonetheless, the press and many elected officials are stunned and have been left with the task of answering the questions: What are the next steps, and what should we make of this? Continue reading “Russia Did it! What Exactly?”

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John’s Post-Election Journal (Part 2): A Tale of Two Factions

As the country processes the rise of Donald Trump to the Executive Office, it would seem to many that this event marks an unparalleled new chapter for the Republican Party. Yet Stephen Mihm insists otherwise in his recent piece in Bloomberg. He observes that the “Old Right,” much resembling the Trump supporters of today, was a vibrant part of the GOP at the beginning of the twentieth century. Their insistence on nationalism, isolationism and anti-immigration was to them essential in making America great. It was not until the start of the Cold War that the Old Right lost prominence as outward-looking conservatives took center stage. But now, for causes I observed in my first article, the Old Right has returned to prominence within the party.

Seeing now that the Republican Party must be shared between traditional conservatives and non-conservatives, I have suggestions for both groups going forward. Continue reading “John’s Post-Election Journal (Part 2): A Tale of Two Factions”

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Silicon Valley workers’ political attacks show hypocrisy

Maxwell Rohlfs is a friend of 3rd Law. Below is part of his Op-Ed for The Hill.

 

Silicon Valley prides itself on being open-minded and diverse. But this year’s election showed us that when it comes to politics, the Valley expects rigid conformity.

In 2016, the tech world largely united behind Hillary Clinton. Silicon Valley employees gave 60 times more cash to Clinton than to Trump. 100 tech leaders signed a letter calling Donald Trump a “disaster” for innovation. Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz donated a stunning $35 million to groups supporting Clinton’s campaign.

The few in Silicon Valley who had the audacity to support the other major party candidate for president were treated like blasphemers. When billionaire investor Peter Thiel gave $1.25 million to support Donald Trump’s campaign, the backlash was swift.

Catherine Bracy, former Director of Community Organizing for Code for America, was one of many tech figures who demanded Facebook oust Thiel from its board of directors. Bracy even tweeted, “Would like to see no women or people of color — heck, maybe white men too — accept jobs at Facebook until Thiel is gone.”

Continue reading at The Hill.

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John’s Post-Election Journal (Part 1): A Neglected People

Note: This is the first installment of post-election reflections by John McDonough. His next several posts will include takeaways on what Donald Trump’s election means for the United States going forward.

 

After several weeks to digest, Donald Trump’s election still has America in a state of shock. A man who has shown no trace of self-control, and with an apparent lack of general knowledge of what the Executive does or stands for has led his so-called “deplorables” to the Oval Office. 

It seems this election must be a gross mistake. If Hillary Clinton had just taken a different approach in her campaign, or if her PACs had just shifted their messaging, then this never would have happened. On the other hand, if you supported Trump, then his election may seem like hitting the lottery. He had no discernible shot at the presidency, but somehow just pulled it out of thin air. Continue reading “John’s Post-Election Journal (Part 1): A Neglected People”

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A Confession and Exhortation

“TRUMP TRIUMPHS.”

What a cruise missile of a headline to wake up to on a fittingly cold, gray, and rainy day in London. Like many, I was more than surprised by his victory. I was floored, astonished, speechless. Surely, the most disliked presidential candidate in modern American history couldn’t have pulled it off. And yet, there Trump was on Thursday, meeting with President Obama at the White House to discuss the transition of power.

Though I knew I’d be surprised, even embarrassed for my country, if Trump prevailed, I must admit I did not anticipate three emotions in particular: sadness, fear, and shame. Continue reading “A Confession and Exhortation”

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Vox Writer Omits Key Facts to Downplay Clinton’s Email Scandal

Vox writer, Matthew Yglesias, wrote a piece which is currently the site’s most popular with over six-thousand shares on Facebook alone—not to mention the number of times it has crossed my inbox. In it, he claims Clinton’s email scandal is nothing more than a fabrication of the media. In the process, Yglesias brushes over the entire pay-for-play aspect and other facts surrounding the investigation.

His most consequential omissions, however, have to do with Comey’s decision in July not to recommend an indictment. Below are some things he didn’t mention. Continue reading “Vox Writer Omits Key Facts to Downplay Clinton’s Email Scandal”

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James Comey’s Scarlet-Letter Moment

Guilt is a powerful emotion. It destroyed Nathaniel Hawthorne’s character, Arthur Dimmesdale, in The Scarlet Letter. In the same way, guilt left FBI director James Comey, a man known for his moral rectitude, grappling for redemption last week. His letter to Congress, which divulged the reopening of Hillary Clinton’s email investigation, was his attempt to make up for his failure to recommend her indictment this summer.

Speculative? Sure. But it makes sense. Comey, the head of the FBI, did something bizarre. His letter this close to an election stepped out of the bounds of tradition and procedure. Even critics of Clinton, like Rep. Jim Jordan and Fox News’ Judge Jeanine Pirro, have noted Comey’s letter was out of bounds. Continue reading “James Comey’s Scarlet-Letter Moment”

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Clinton/Trump Round Two: Thoughts After the Second Debate

On Sunday night, the winner of the debate was Donald Trump.

Don’t get me wrong. I think he did horribly.  But in politics, it doesn’t matter what you and I think. What truly matters is what “they” think. The “they” I’m referring to are the undecided voters who were watching. Those are the people who ultimately make a difference come election day. With less than a month left, this debate was good for Trump.  Continue reading “Clinton/Trump Round Two: Thoughts After the Second Debate”

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