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The Problem of Political Science: Why Scientific Inquiry Does Not Always Translate Well Into Social Phenomenological Explanation

Oliver Thomas

I just arrived in Vancouver on September 1 to begin my graduate studies in Political Science at the University of British Columbia. After thumbing through a required text titled Designing Social Inquiry, I’m already worried about course content this Fall. Continue reading “The Problem of Political Science: Why Scientific Inquiry Does Not Always Translate Well Into Social Phenomenological Explanation”

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Labelled for resuse- Wikimedia Commons

The Contradiction of Personal Responsibility

Hayden Couvillion

PBS recounted a story in early of July of a four year old, who unable to pay for her breakfast, had her lunch dumped in the trash. The teaching assistant who witnessed the incident said “She did not protest, other than to walk away in tears.”

Known as ‘lunch shaming,’ throwing away a meal, or otherwise penalizing a student for their inability to pay for it is not unusual. According to the USDA, about half of all school districts shame their students if they cannot afford their breakfast or lunch. And the reasoning often falls outside budgetary concerns, instead falling within a school administration’s desire to teach kids and parents responsibility. As one commenter on a story outlining a similar lunch shaming incident wrote “Personal responsibility is important for these kids to learn.” Continue reading “The Contradiction of Personal Responsibility”

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tpsdave: photo labelled for common reuse.

4 Questions on Trump/Russia, From One Republican to Another.

Jeff Steigen

After James Comey was fired, the “I” word has been thrown around DC like a football, and the administration has been slow in its attempts to tackle the charging imbroglio. As a result,  43 percent of Americans think Congress should start the impeachment process. Thankfully, for the administration, the appointment of special counsel Robert Mueller has provided some breathing room.

Isn’t that strange to think about? Most people probably never imagined a special prosecutor would be involved in this situation. But it’s happening, and in case people need a reminder after the Clinton email debacle, an FBI investigation means something. As patriots, we need to take this issue seriously.

So, as the Russia circus cools down for a while, I think there are several questions everyone—especially my fellow Republicans—should ask themselves. I’ve included my own thoughts in response to each one. Continue reading “4 Questions on Trump/Russia, From One Republican to Another.”

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The Story of Junaluska

Hayden Couvillion

Andrew Jackson has become a figure of historical fixation over the last few years . In April of last year, it was announced he was being removed from the twenty-dollar bill and replaced by a black woman he likely would have despised – Harriet Tubman. And it is well documented that Trump looks to Jackson as something of a historical role-model. In recent weeks Donald Trump has elevated Jackson’s historical standing, claiming Jackson would have prevented the Civil War. Continue reading “The Story of Junaluska”

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100 Days and Pen-and-Phone Governance

Nathan Thompson

Jake Tapper summarized the first 100 days of Donald Trump’s presidency well: “Long on executive orders, short on major legislative accomplishments.

Of course, President Barack Obama was also famously (or infamously, depending upon your point of view) willing to use the “pen and phone” of executive orders to achieve his policy aims. But while many of President Trump’s executive orders have merely erased the ones issued by President Obama, our current commander-in-chief has similarly not shied away from privileging the pen and phone over Congressional legislation. Continue reading “100 Days and Pen-and-Phone Governance”

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“Mr. Chairman, I’m Not Made of Steel”

With this plea, FBI Director Comey asked for a bathroom recess a few hours into a lengthy open hearing on Capitol Hill held on March 20, 2017.

 

Jessica Meyers

The House Intelligence Committee held an open hearing on March 20th on the active measures being taken to investigate potential Russian influences in the election.

Two hours into the hearing, it was nearly impossible to ignore the number of times FBI Director James Comey and NSA Director Mike Rogers both explained their inability to answer certain questions was due to the fact that they couldn’t divulge classified information a public setting. Continue reading ““Mr. Chairman, I’m Not Made of Steel””

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Libertarianism: Hedonism in Freedom’s Clothing

Dave Hansbury

A friend of mine once remarked, “libertarians are simply ideologically consistent progressives.” As a former libertarian, I felt some disgust at the statement. Libertarianism, at least on the surface, is the opposite of progressivism—a far-right reaction to leftward-realing world. While progressives see the state as a tool to overcome man’s oppressions in both the public and private spheres, libertarians see the state as a dangerous and often counter-productive entity which can make disparities worse. Instead, libertarians have taken on the challenge of unshackling mankind from oppression, but with  different views of what constitutes oppression and freedom.

But as I reconsidered my friend’s statement, it began to make more sense. I considered the reasons why I stopped classifying myself as a libertarian. The more I thought about it, the more I came to agree with its premise,especially as I considered the ancient philosophy of hedonism. Continue reading “Libertarianism: Hedonism in Freedom’s Clothing”

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Gorsuch Deserves Confirmation

It seems like there’s a lot of love going around this Valentine’s Day. And if Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein’s exuberance is any indication, Judge Neil Gorsuch may be getting some of that love in his confirmation to the Supreme Court.

There is a lot to say about Gorsuch’s impeccable academic credentials at elite institutions, fantastic writing style, and sterling legal resume. Some liberals have noted that he is not as combative as Justice Scalia was—although perhaps the term bitingly-witty is more accurate.

His most important trait, however, is that he understands his job is to follow the law, not make policy decisions from the bench. His credentials are so impressive both Democrats and Republicans unanimously confirmed him to the tenth circuit court in 2006. Elsewhere, he has been described as the nominee that is “impossible to oppose.” Continue reading “Gorsuch Deserves Confirmation”

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MAKE GOD GREAT AGAIN

“From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward, it’s going to be only America first, America first.”

-President Donald Trump

I can’t be certain, but I’m reasonably confident that two words Jesus of Nazareth never uttered in succession are “America” and “first.”

Contrast this with President Trump’s inaugural address, which placed a heavy emphasis on the privileging of American identity, and you’re left with a jarring dissonance.

This dissonance should be instructive for those engaged in the task of discerning how to live as both faithful Christians and engaged American citizens. To be clear, it’s a task that is exceedingly difficult. But rarely in recent memory has the distinction between Christian and American identity been so starkly laid out. Continue reading “MAKE GOD GREAT AGAIN”

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Reversing the Republican Decline in our Cities

Like the Falcons’ inexplicably terrible finish to Sunday night’s Super Bowl, the Democratic Party in 2016 blew what should have been a winnable election for them. It would not be beyond the pale to label the Democratic Party as it exists now an almost exclusively regional party—one that survives purely because of the existence of the reliably-left coasts and our nation’s major population centers.

But doing so exposes the other, less-scrutinized story of the 2016 election: Republican presence in major cities is evaporating. Continue reading “Reversing the Republican Decline in our Cities”

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