Romney for Secretary of State

This past weekend, Kellyanne Conway and Newt Gingrich made headlines for criticizing Mitt Romney. Both advised President-elect Trump against choosing the former Massachusetts Governor and 2012 Republican presidential nominee as his Secretary of State. Romney is currently being considered for the position, despite previously calling Trump a phony and a fraud. According to Conway,  his loyalty is in question because he “went out of his way to hurt Trump.”

Regardless of their past, Romney would make a great Secretary of State, and Trump would do well in choosing him. Continue reading “Romney for Secretary of State”

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Vox Writer Omits Key Facts to Downplay Clinton’s Email Scandal

Vox writer, Matthew Yglesias, wrote a piece which is currently the site’s most popular with over six-thousand shares on Facebook alone—not to mention the number of times it has crossed my inbox. In it, he claims Clinton’s email scandal is nothing more than a fabrication of the media. In the process, Yglesias brushes over the entire pay-for-play aspect and other facts surrounding the investigation.

His most consequential omissions, however, have to do with Comey’s decision in July not to recommend an indictment. Below are some things he didn’t mention. Continue reading “Vox Writer Omits Key Facts to Downplay Clinton’s Email Scandal”

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James Comey’s Scarlet-Letter Moment

Guilt is a powerful emotion. It destroyed Nathaniel Hawthorne’s character, Arthur Dimmesdale, in The Scarlet Letter. In the same way, guilt left FBI director James Comey, a man known for his moral rectitude, grappling for redemption last week. His letter to Congress, which divulged the reopening of Hillary Clinton’s email investigation, was his attempt to make up for his failure to recommend her indictment this summer.

Speculative? Sure. But it makes sense. Comey, the head of the FBI, did something bizarre. His letter this close to an election stepped out of the bounds of tradition and procedure. Even critics of Clinton, like Rep. Jim Jordan and Fox News’ Judge Jeanine Pirro, have noted Comey’s letter was out of bounds. Continue reading “James Comey’s Scarlet-Letter Moment”

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What the Critics get Wrong on Charter Schools

This summer, charter schools came under a barrage of criticism from organizations like the NAACP, and even HBO comedian, John Oliver.

This is despite the fact that charter schools are highly popular and praised by both parties in the United States —and for good reasons. They help low-income and minority students by offering an alternative in failing school districts. As a result, there is ample evidence that charter schools provide significantly better education than their public counterparts. Continue reading “What the Critics get Wrong on Charter Schools”

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A Public Option Would Leave Us Optionless

Choice and competition are the bedrocks of innovation and affordability in the market. If there are multiple companies competing for consumer money, the winner will be the one which either increases the value of their product or finds a way to lower its cost. In contrast, fewer choices and less competition give companies more leverage to set higher prices and relieve any pressure to add value.

Last Thursday, President Obama seemed to reaffirm these bedrocks in his speech on fixing the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Unfortunately, the public option he proposed to increase choice and competition — perhaps the most consequential of his three “tweaks” — would do the exact opposite. Continue reading “A Public Option Would Leave Us Optionless”

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Clinton/Trump Round Two: Thoughts After the Second Debate

On Sunday night, the winner of the debate was Donald Trump.

Don’t get me wrong. I think he did horribly.  But in politics, it doesn’t matter what you and I think. What truly matters is what “they” think. The “they” I’m referring to are the undecided voters who were watching. Those are the people who ultimately make a difference come election day. With less than a month left, this debate was good for Trump.  Continue reading “Clinton/Trump Round Two: Thoughts After the Second Debate”

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Silicon Valley Housing Crisis

Recently, Palo Alto’s mayor, Patrick Burt, made a statement which is receiving national attention. The Wall Street Journal reports:

“We’re looking to increase the rate of housing growth,” he told Curbed San Francisco, “but decrease the rate of job growth.”

Decrease job growth? At a time when political candidates are fiercely debating how to increase the number of jobs, why is this mayor hoping to limit them? Continue reading “Silicon Valley Housing Crisis”

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Lame-Duck Session Woes

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Don’t look now. The Affordable Care Act is crumbling.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are dominating the media. I saw this first hand when I worked in a newsroom over the summer: The coverage was non-stop!

They are not, however, the biggest story of the summer. Based on a steady stream of articles and studies, I’m convinced that if it weren’t for this highly extraordinary election, 2016 would be known as the summer the Affordable Care Act (ACA) started to crumble. Continue reading “Don’t look now. The Affordable Care Act is crumbling.”

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Letter to friend on the 2016 Republican primary

_____,

Thank you so much for asking for my opinion on the 2016 election so far. Particularly on the Republican primary. While the Democratic primary indeed contains a level of drama itself (a potentially convicted felon vs. a socialist), there is not doubt that any soap opera would pale to this new season for the Republican Party.

I’ve decided to write my opinion on each Republican candidate and their chances of winning. Here goes nothing. Continue reading “Letter to friend on the 2016 Republican primary”

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