The Republican Party, Trump and Free Trade

After Barack Obama defeated Mitt Romney in 2012, the Republican Party vowed to make some big changes.  One of the issues the establishment Republicans promised to rally behind was free trade.  Most conservatives embraced the party’s newfound focus, and this past election, Republican voters had the opportunity to elect a nominee who would defend their right to free and open commerce. Continue reading “The Republican Party, Trump and Free Trade”

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A Public Option Would Leave Us Optionless

Choice and competition are the bedrocks of innovation and affordability in the market. If there are multiple companies competing for consumer money, the winner will be the one which either increases the value of their product or finds a way to lower its cost. In contrast, fewer choices and less competition give companies more leverage to set higher prices and relieve any pressure to add value.

Last Thursday, President Obama seemed to reaffirm these bedrocks in his speech on fixing the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Unfortunately, the public option he proposed to increase choice and competition — perhaps the most consequential of his three “tweaks” — would do the exact opposite. Continue reading “A Public Option Would Leave Us Optionless”

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Silicon Valley Housing Crisis

Recently, Palo Alto’s mayor, Patrick Burt, made a statement which is receiving national attention. The Wall Street Journal reports:

“We’re looking to increase the rate of housing growth,” he told Curbed San Francisco, “but decrease the rate of job growth.”

Decrease job growth? At a time when political candidates are fiercely debating how to increase the number of jobs, why is this mayor hoping to limit them? Continue reading “Silicon Valley Housing Crisis”

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